How to think, not what to think – Think Jar Collective

Jesse Richardson shares in his TEDx Brisbane talk about how to think, not what to think. Richardson shares some great insights on critical thinking.

Source: thinkjarcollective.com

“Creative thinking is nothing more than making connections. What I’m advocating here is less like art and more like design. Art is creative expression, whereas design solves problems.” Nice repositioning of divergent and convergent thinking as well.

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | MIT Technology Review

Source: www.technologyreview.com

A must-read article for people truly interested in the nature of creativity.  Big shout out to Robin Wiley for pointing it in my direction.

Would love to know your insights and connections.  Marvelous piece.

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

Maslow’s Creative Attitude: For Facilitators, Leaders and Catalysts

Use psychologist Abraham Maslow’s inspiration to bolster your leadership and facilitation as WCIW 2015 catalyst. Other leaders may also find this wisdom helpful when  looking for ways to embed the creative attitude in day-to-day life.

The  Creative Attitude ( in Abraham Maslow, The Further Reaches of Human Nature, 1971, p 57 – 71).  Book review here (recommended reading, especially the small section on Work and Creativity).

  • Being in the present: Giving up the past; giving up the future
  • Innocence: Giving up should’s and ought’s
  • Narrowing  Consciousness: Releasing fear of other people, drop masks, express true inner self
  • Loss of Ego or Self Consciousness: Less criticizing and editing; less selecting and rejecting; less judging and weighing; less splitting and analyzing of the experience.
  • Inhibiting Force of Consciousness (of Self): Release doubts, conflicts and fears
  • Fears Disappear
  • Lessening of Defenses and Inhibitions: Become less guarded, act on impulse
  • Strength and Courage: Stubbornness, Independence of thought and action, self-sufficiency, strength of character; Popularity is a minor concern
  • Acceptance: The positive attitude: Give up criticism (editing, picking and choosing, correcting, skepticism, improving, doubting, rejecting, judging, evaluating)
  • Trust vs. Trying, Controlling, Striving: Trust in self, Self confidence, courage, lack of fear of the world
  • Receptivity: Let it happen
  • Permission to Dip into Primary Process: Poetic, metaphoric, mystic, primitive, archaic, childlike
  • Aesthetic Perceiving Rather than Abstracting: Savor, enjoy, appreciate, care all in a non-controlling, non-intruding and non-interfering way
  • Fullest Spontaneity: Concentrate on the matter at hand; let capacities flow forth easily from within; adapt to the situation
  • Fullest Expressiveness (of Uniqueness): Honest expression, naturalness, truthfulness, lack of guile, non-imitativeness
  • Fusion of the Person with the World: As Hokusai said, “If you want to draw a bird, you must become a bird.”

 

Stress stifles creativity, study shows

You know this from personal experience, and now here’s a study you can quote to make a point.  These researchers looked for creativity as the ability to think flexibly.  Would you agree that’s a needed skill these days? 
What are ways to use World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21 to help people in your organization, your team, your family learn how to think more flexibly?

Here’s the study

A 2004  study by David Beversdorf, an assistant professor in Ohio State’s department of neurology, and Jessa Alexander, a research assistant in the department, revealed a correlation between medical students’ stress levels and their performance on various types of tests.

Beversdorf and Alexander gave 19 medical students three tests, one or two days before a midterm, a time when the students attested to being under large amounts of stress.

In a memory test, students were asked to repeat strings of numbers up to nine in length. In the first creative problem-solving test, the same students were given three words and then asked to think of one word that could be combined with all three to form a compound word or short phrase.

In the last test Beversdorf and Alexander had the students fill in the only blank spot on a grid that had a series of shapes and symbols. The medical students were given a list of possible solutions and asked to choose the shape or symbol that best fit with the other shapes in the grid.

Students did considerably better on the memorization test, indicating that they were not able to think as flexibly during times of stress.

“We were curious in a real-world setting whether stressers may be reacting to (norepinephrine), causing changes in cognitive performance,” Beversdorf said.

Norepinephrine is a chemical compound found in the brain that has long been identified with subconscious response to threatening situations.

The researchers administered similar tests to the same students one week after their midterms, a period of time when they were less likely to be stressed. The students performed slightly worse on the memory test, yet did better on the word and grid test.

“We have done studies with artificial stressers in the lab,” Alexander said. “I wanted to look at a more natural stresser in a setting that occurs normally to see how identical we could get to (the lab results).”

Other experts at OSU were not surprised by the results of the study.

“When individuals are faced with a challenging task, they are less likely to perform well in complex situations,” said Jennifer Graham, a postdoctoral fellow at OSU’s Institute of Behavioral Medicine Research. “The nature of the two situations here is relevant only in that it indicates recalling a list of numbers is a simpler task than complex problem solving.”

In order to add more validity to their results, Beversdorf and Alexander are currently in the process of gathering a larger field of participants for similar research to be conducted this winter.

Beversdorf is also conducting research involving functional MRI scanning to measure the effects of norepinephrine, as well as studying the effects of cocaine on cognitive processes.

 

From TheLantern.com

Who is the WCIW 2015 go-to person in your organization?

Yes, that’s right.

Who is the person or who are the people/groups leading the charge of celebrating creativity and innovation at your location from April 15 -21,  2015?

Don’t you agree that it would be great to give people around you (virtually too) a creative-thinking ‘boost’ during the World Creativity and Innovation Week celebrations?

Findings from a global 2012 survey conducted by Adobe, State of Creativity Study,  (pdf here) support doing just that.  Their global survey unveiled that

  • Unlocking creative potential is seen as key to economic and social growth
  • Globally, less than 1 in 4 people (of the 5000  surveyed) feel they are living up to their creative potential
  • There is increasing pressure to be productive rather than creative at work

So here’s your opportunity to buck the trend for only one week every year:  to celebrate the talents your people, customers, and/or suppliers have to generate new ideas, make new decisions and take new actions that make the world a better place and make their place in the world better too. WCIW April 15 – 21 is a time to explore your creativity, and help others do the same.  It’s great when there’s some unbridled joy in the mix too.

So whoever your WCIW rep is your organization, make sure they subscribe to this blog for support and ideas.  They can join our  groups - World Creativity and Innovation Week Global (on Facebook) and World Creativity (on LinkedIn) – for updates and other connections.

Appoint someone today to be your go-to person for WCIW 2015 and give them the opportunity to create something wonderful and meaningful for your culture and organization.

BTW, What do you think about our hosting a world teleconference the week after WCIW 2015 to compare notes among organizational reps?

What are Your Five Words? Word Dance Inspiration – Clues for People and Organizations Wanting to Celebrate WCIW 2015

A favourite technique for idea generating is to make connections and gather insights through reviewing word lists.  I call it a Word Dance. You can use this technique to generate  ideas for your April 15 – 21 WCIW 2015 celebration.

Years ago, I did a Word Dance on create, creator, creativity,  creative, problem, solving and creation using the Oxford Thesaurus. Here’s the list for your use.  It would be great to know your 5 words and how they combine to create your WCIW 2015 seed of celebration.

How to use these lists:  Scan through and stay open to be energized by a few words.  Select a few, maybe 5 from the entire collection.  Then combine those words to create the way or ways you might celebrate WCIW 2015.

Note:  Transcribing this list for you was a fascinating experience. Insights bubbled up.

Insight 1: The ask for WCIW 2015 and beyond. To create a way to celebrate creativity and innovation.  Read through the CREATE word-list to get inside what that might mean for you.  Autonomy rocks!  Make sure to share your insights too.  I think this is a great exercise.

Insight 2: The importance of clarity because each word – create, creator, creative, problem, solving and creation – has so many different meanings and associations.

  • CREATE
    begin
    breed
    beget
    bring
    bring into being
    cause
    coin
    compose
    conceive
    construct
    contrive
    design
    develop
    devise
    draw
    dream up
    effect
    engender
    erect
    establish
    fabricate
    fashion
    father
    forge
    form
    found
    frame
    generate
    get
    imagine
    induce
    initiate
    invent
    lead
    make
    manufacture
    mastermind
    occasion
    organize
    originate
    output
    pioneer
    raise
    rear
    render
    script
    sire
    spawn
    start
    think
    think up
    tum
    weave
    work
    write
  • CREATOR
    architect
    author
    cause
    Deity
    designer
    father
    founder
    framer
    God
    initiator
    inventor
    lord
    maker
    mastermind
    originator
    prime mover
    producer
    source
    stock
    Supreme being
  • CREATIVITY
    fancy
    fantasy
    imagination
    ingenuity
    originality
  • CREATIVE
    artistic
    brilliant
    clever
    imaginative
    ingenious
    new
    novel
    original
    originative
    productive
    prolific
    resourceful
    revolutionary
    seminal
    slick
    vivid
  • PROBLEM
    business
    can of worms
    catch
    challenge
    complication
    concern
    conundrum
    delinquent
    difficult/difficulty
    dilemma
    disturbed
    drawback
    embarrassment
    emotional upset
    enigma
    kettle of fish
    fly
    handful
    headache
    hitch
    hornet’s nest
    imbroglio
    incorrigible
    intractable
    issue
    job
    lookout
    maladjusted
    matter
    mess
    mind-boggler
    muddle
    obstreperous
    paradox
    perplexity
    pickle
    poser
    predicament
    pressure
    pretty pickle
    puzzle
    puzzler
    quandary
    question
    refractory
    reverse
    riddle
    rub
    snag
    snarl
    static
    stew
    tough nut to crack
    trouble
    uncontrollable
    ungovernable
    unmanageable
    unruly
    worry
  • SOLVING
    answering
    clarifying
    clearing up
    cracking
    deciphering
    elucidating
    explaining
    explicating
    figuring
    figuring out
    interpreting
    making clear
    making plain
    puzzling
    resolving
    revealing
    satisfying
    sorting
    tackling
    unraveling
    working
  •  CREATION
    beginning
    birth
    formation
    genesis
    inception
    making
    origin
    start

What are your five words?  What ideas come to mind for ways to  celebrate WCIW 2015?

Open for new ideas, new decisions, new actions

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